Biking to Lunch in Mountain View from Willow Glen, July 2011

Cool pedestrian bridge on Stevens Creek Train

I’m very excited that the Bay Area trails are starting to create pathways to fun places all around the bay, without having to leave protected bike trails. In July I rode from my house in the Willow Glen neighborhood of San Jose to have lunch in Mountain View, taking the Guadalupe River Trail to the San Francisco Bay Trail to Stevens Creek Trail. I only had to use surface streets three times, all for very short distances with little traffic. Continue reading Biking to Lunch in Mountain View from Willow Glen, July 2011

Death Ride, July 2011

Jim signing the board at the top of Carson Pass.

So I completed the second of my 4 events for the year – the California “Death Ride“, so named because it covers 129 miles over 5 mountain passes, totaling 15000 feet of climbing, all at high elevation! It is not a race: there were no timing mats to cross, no split times. In fact, there were numerous rest stations where the riders took the time to get off their bikes to rest and eat and chat with other riders. But with all those miles and all those climbs, finishing before the cut-off would be my challenge. Continue reading Death Ride, July 2011

GE, NCR Lead “Reshoring” Trend

 

GE GeoSpring™ Hybrid Heater

Faced with rising costs, General Electric moved production of a new energy-efficient hotwater heater halfway around the world – to Kentucky. CP Lab Safety moved manufacturing from China to California to cut costs. Tesla moved final assembly of its battery packs to California to minimize delivery delays to customers.

In a recent blog, I discussed some of the drawbacks of offshoring manufacturing jobs (“Boeing 787 Illustrates The Dangers of Offshoring,”). Today I am writing about a growing trend in manufacturing: “reshoring” jobs back to the United States. Continue reading GE, NCR Lead “Reshoring” Trend

My Life in Bands, Part Three

The Night Shift Band (back row: Dana, Phil, Carlos, Odys, David; front row: John, Tiffany, Gayle, Joe)

I love to see people dance while I’m performing on stage. And if they’re cheering and calling for an encore, it’s so gratifying that I almost feel famous. (This is what happens when a shy kid gets a lot of attention.) Cover bands often get that kind of reception, which makes them fun to play with. Over the last several years I have been a full time keyboardist for two popular cover bands that mainly play R&B and pop hits. Continue reading My Life in Bands, Part Three

Hunter-Liggett Under Blue, Blue Skies

Abandoned tank at Fort Hunter Liggett

I had a great bike ride on Friday, June 10, from Mission San Antonio to Highway 1 and back, through Fort Hunter Liggett. I’m training for the Death Ride on July 9, so I needed to get in some long hilly rides. I was on my way to my folks house in San Luis Obispo – recently rated one the happiest places on earth! – so I stopped at Hunter Liggett. Because it’s an army base, you can’t park just anywhere. Mission San Antonio, however, is just across the road. Continue reading Hunter-Liggett Under Blue, Blue Skies

Boston Marathon, 2011

With my finisher’s medal at the end of the race

Prelude to the Race

This was a race I planned long in advance, because I would be entering a new age group. I have great ambitions for this year, not just for the Boston Marathon, but also for the Death Ride, Ironman Canada, and the Alcatraz Invitational Swim. The Boston Marathon required a qualifying time, which I took care of by running a 3:40:04 marathon at Napa in March 2010, where I came in 5th of 79 in my age group (read my blog about it). At the time, I was excited with the results, but that quickly passed when I recalled how humbling it is to run Boston, where the winner in my age group probably would be done with breakfast by the time I finished. Continue reading Boston Marathon, 2011

$10M Views Bicycling from Oakland to Richmond

I had fantastic views of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge all day.

My previous trip along the San Francisco Bay Trail ended with a walk up Hegenberger Road with a flat tire to get to the Oakland Coliseum BART. This time, I rode down Hegenberger with a new steel-belted front tire watching out for broken glass and other sharp objects. Between Oakland and Richmond the path is mostly paved and car-free, offering $10 million views of the bay, San Francisco, the Berkeley hills, and eastern Marin. Continue reading $10M Views Bicycling from Oakland to Richmond

Phoenix Tech Pubs Update: April 2011

In a busy first quarter, Phoenix Technical Publications recently welcomed a new staff member who has a Ph.D. in Genetics and is a biosciences writing expert. We have worked with both new and existing clients on interesting projects and we are getting involved in several exciting new technologies. Continue reading Phoenix Tech Pubs Update: April 2011

Going Further, Faster at 60

At the finish of the Coeur d’Alene Ironman Triathlon 2010

This is a big year for me. I’ve turned 60 years old and I feel great! I’ve got much to look forward to, and much to look back on. Specifically, I’m looking forward to placing high in my new age group in the Boston Marathon in April, the Tour of California Alps Death Ride in July, the Ironman Canada triathlon in August, and the Alcatraz Invitational swim in September. Wow! What a way to celebrate being alive! Continue reading Going Further, Faster at 60